Monday, 14 August 2017

Star Wars Identities - a show worth waiting for

I've just returned, tired and satisfied, from a weekend of exhibitions in London. The first one I caught was Star Wars Identities at the O2. It started off badly but eventually won me over with its amazing collection of original props, models and costumes.

As I get older I've come to realise I'm now fairly grumpy and dislike being told what to do. The trend of exhibitions wanting to 'take you on a jouney' just irritates me. When you add in dodgey audio guides, they make me feel like I'm locked to an on-rails shooter that won't allow my head to turn. After way too much waiting, poor crowd control and some unhelpful staff, off came the audio guide and I headed for the fun stuff, resolutely ignoring the rather strange meta-narrative of the show.

This 'story' behind the exhibition panders to a culture obsessed with social media. The curators clearly thought that the viewer needs to be at the centre of everything. Hence the tour is broken up by way stations where you get to make choices and learn about how identity is constructed. While I found this distracting, baffling, and creepy (coming from the multi-billion dollar corporation that is Disney), folk seemed to enjoy it so I shouldn't be too harsh on the creators. I was there for the props and costumes, and - oh boy - was I not disappointed. There are originals from throughout the canon including a load from the pre-production of A New Hope. Here are some of my favourites, which included the more obscure stuff.

The original Ponda Baba mask from the Canteena. This thing is nearly 40 years old and I was surprised at how well the latex has lasted.

A Sandperson. The attention to detail on this costume was quite stunning and at odds with many of the New Hope costumes. He also had his gaffie stick, which was a solid affair made of metal.

This guy needs no introduction.

The show's lighting was pretty awesome and in the last room the engineers really went to town with the Death Star-style neon tubing. There was only one 'fail' where a case containing lots of star ship models wasn't working, so the things annoyingly remained in the dark.

I had seen reproductions of this Ralf McQuarrie painting many times before. What I didn't know was this it actually dated from a brief period when Lucas was thinking of making Luke a girl - hence 'his' lithe silhouette in this drawing.

One of Jabba's eyes. The detail on this thing is stunning.

Concepts for Yoda (then called 'Minch') and his house. Many of the hut drawings reminded me of the work of Roger Dean, with a 70s vibe to the silhouettes.

I spent ages looking at these helmets. The prop makers seem to have made the insignia in a variety of ways - some were stencilled on, others were hand painted but many of the small icons seem to be self adhesive stickers which have since peeled a bit.

An interesting behind-the-scenes chart made to keep the fx crew on track when it came to ship dynamics.
 
Concepts for a really wacky abandoned scene where the Emperor appears to Vader in a form that keeps changing - at some moments appearing like a woman (with hindsight, perhaps Padme Amidala?)

In contrast to the Sandperson costume, it was interesting to see how many parts of the New Hope outfits were pretty basic in their construction. This arm detail from Luke's flight suit is a good example, being roughly painted vac-formed plastic. Boots were another instance. In the 70s costumes existing boots seem to have been used, but by the time of Empire the budget allowed for custom-designed footwear.

Star Wars Identities doesn't have much longer left to run so get down there by the 3rd of September if you want to see it. If you're a fan of props, costumes or the IP you won't be disappointed. Just be prepared for some annoying waiting before you go in.

Friday, 21 July 2017

Skulls for the Skull Throne!

For those of you who enjoy destroying puny mortals in the digital realm, you'll be pleased to hear that there is a Games Workshop Steam sale! Skulls for the Skull Throne has up to 90% off lots of licensed titles, a Twitch community and some free digital goodies.

This is a bit special for a couple of reasons; I helped set the sale up and made the marketing assets, including the rather natty logo.


So if you want to field Krell in Total War: WARHAMMER, or stomp about in Chaplain Terminator Armour in Deathwing, get over to Steam now.

Saturday, 15 July 2017

Xenos dance off

Sorry for the re-post. Technical issues. Now with pictures!

My regular opponent Mr T laid down some smack talk which, after some clarification, amounted to his Tyranids wanting a bit of a scrap. I was still smarting from our previous encounter and figured this would be a good debut for my Harlequins. We turned up, kit in hand, at Warhammer World, and ended up on a strange but exquisite table. We figured it was maybe a Maiden World. With handy dandy objectives.


I managed to unlock the achievement of a deploying in way that was not stupid. This proved that learning had occurred since my last travesty of a set-up where I left my Whirlwind in the open. My Troupes sheltered in cover while applying the last of their makeup. On the opposite side the Skyweaver Jetbikes hovered behind a tower as they tuned their synths and complained about how their bodysuits always got so sweaty. My Death Jester, took up position in a ruin with his candy cane catapult.


Across the clearing the chitinous hoard skittered out of the ruins. The Broodlord sniffed the air and gnashed his teeth, eager to taste some Aeldari meat.

When the beats started pumping, my Harlequins began the routine they had been practising in anticipation of their big chance. The Skyweavers grabbed the left objective and busted some victory moves. They were utterly appalled when their rhythm was broken by a massive, slavering, four-armed murder bastard jumped from the crowd and tore into them.


After a zig zag little number, one Troupe grabbed the centre objective. The audience went wild! Oh, wait. Maybe a little too wild. And why is that rowdy fan skewering Johnny Lasers with his talons? Cue some Harlequin kissing (no, not like that) and the offender was subdued.


On the far right the other Troupe went for a fairly straightforward routine overseen by their Leader, Atomic Eddie. While ensuring his proteges strutted their stuff he was baffled by how offencive that big sinapse guy was being. "Maybe he's a judge?" he thought. Then casually inflicted four wounds on the thing. Soon the judge and all its chittering supporters were strewn about in pieces. Warlord down! Bonus points, surely?



Back in the centre the crowd was going nuts! Ultimately the Skyweavers bowed out (thanks to blood loss on their part) but the Troupe was having a ball. They slayed all the Termagants with glittery backflips then dropped the mic by kicking a Carnifex in the nuts. Repeatedly.



In all it was a stellar debut and I'm sure we'll be seeing more from this group. Their only hope is that they get a less drunk audience next time. In truth I was surprised at how well they did, as I was convinced I'd lost by turn two. Testament to the 8th edition rules was that I only won by one victory point, again proving that the Power Level system is very well balanced. I'd be terrified to field these guys against heavy armour, and really suffered by not having a psyker. So next up will be a Shadowseer (probably an old High Warlock mini) and some looted Robots.

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you very much. We are The Weeping Dawn. You've been wonderful. Thank you and good night!

Tuesday, 4 July 2017

Want some candy?

I've gone all Oldhammer again and painted another unit of Harlequins. These clowns will join what is now becoming a medium sized force, with ten infantry, two characters and three jetbikes (or 'Skyweavers' in new money).



I am really pleased I opted for the 'candy stripe' scheme when I started this army. It's pretty easy to paint and conjures up the circus vibe I was going for. I love the lozenge patterns which are traditional for Harlequins but the thought of rolling them out over an entire army terrifies me. Even more than the idea of bouncing murder-bastard clowns.

I would love to do a looted vehicle next to bulk these guys out. Perhaps something that 'counts as' a Starweaver? Or maybe some Imperial Robots which the Harles could program to dance awkwardly in their performances (while they chant, "Do the robot!").

♠  ♢ ♣ ♤ ♥ ♧♦♦◊△ ▲▽ ▼

Friday, 16 June 2017

Welcome to Planet F**k You!

"Let's f**king do this!"

...screams the heroine in Tormentor X Punisher, E-Studio's twin-stick shooter before a hoard of crazed demons emerge from burning hexes. Cue a lot of heavy firepower, demon-gore and some very bad language.

My favourite facet of video games is graphics and design, and TXP is a real retro-clone treat. Inspired by 16bit outings like Doom, Splatterhouse and Primal Rage, artist Tuuka Stefanson has done a great job on the title. His busy, detailed logo is superb and embodies the kind of heavy metal gore-porn that typifies the game.

Once you get past the loading screens and options menu, massive, red demon-hands rip open the view to reveal the arena where you're going to be making a lot of things die. At this point the genius of the design is its simplicity. The animation is smooth, the sprites stand out in such a way that the frenetic carnage never becomes unintelligible. A neat trick they pull is that the bright red gore quickly fades to a deep crimson so as not to obscure the next tide of attackers. The naive, balloon font used for text is both easy to read and a great signifier that the designers are not taking this game too seriously. But you probably already guessed that.

TXP is published by Raw Fury Games and is available on Steam.



 




Wednesday, 14 June 2017

When a stealth bomber has sex with KITT in a Lovecraft story

I'm usually disappointed at how slowly the look of tech changes. The cases and chassis seem reliably homogeneous and largely ignore any other trends in, say, surface design.

Don't get me wrong, there are great reasons why progress is so glacial. The UI is the thing that changes according to the zeitgeist, and the current trend is to minimise the presence of the casing altogether, so putting the UI at the forefront. Also, these products are expensive to manufacture and there is a lot at stake. Each model is worth hundreds of thousands or millions of pounds in revenue. Hence flirting with a trend just isn't viable. So how about we just give it a matte black or silver case, eh?

When something like the Shadow turns up, it's really striking. The company makes weird, illuminated-but-black boxes of non-Euclidean geometry. They look like a stealth bomber had sex with KITT in a Lovecraft story. In fact, it's so weird I can't quite work out what it does or if Shadow makes just one product or several (but that might be due to the 'Fringlish' copy on the website). But, you know what? I don't care. I just want one. And 'Shadow' is definitely not an ominous name for a tech company.

I am reminded of the Sandbenders in William Gibson's Idoru. A colony of craftspeople, they make bespoke tech using a very Arts and Crafts approach to the externals. A chassis made out of mahogany and slate? Yes please. But no hokey Steampunk tomfoolery - I want good design, without superfluous frivolity.




Saturday, 3 June 2017

Bloody Haemonculi

Welcome to another irreverent battle report! If you're looking for tactical insights and strategic tips, you should probably just pass along right now. But if you do get to the end there is a treat in store for you...

My regular opponent, Mr T, decided to shed his Tyranid carapace and instead threw his lot in with the Haemonculus Covens. He's done a smashing job painting a small force which was pitted against my Blood Angels. Queue set-up, roll offs and missions and all that jazz. I think we were capturing objectives and slaying Warlords. Or something. I was mainly there to kill Xenos.

To be honest, things started off pretty badly for me as I managed to chuff-up my deployment. I got excited handling my newly-painted Razorback and inadvertently put it in a stupid place. The roof-surfing Death Company mini is a reminder that the tank driver was ever-so-pleased to be sharing his shiny ride with five frothing lunatics.


My 90s Scouts took up position in a ruined building. They did their best at trying to hide against the grey walls but found their bright red armour and yellow undercrackers didn't make this an easy task.


Everybody ran forwards. There was a bit of killing. Notably a combat squad of Tactical Marines foot-slogged up the right flank to be greeted by a Raider full of angry Haemonculi. The Marines held out surprisingly well and succeeded in slowing down the Xenos for a couple of turns. I'm now more at-peace with seeing my troops whittled down if they're tying up more expensive enemy units like this.

The Razorback driver was palpably relieved when his cargo of maniacs disgorged into the fray around an objective. They tore through a Haemonculus squad then rushed the enemy Warlord. The puny alien was doomed. Stupid Xenos.


However, behind a rocky outcrop my Warlord wasn't having fun. The Chaplain vaguely imagined the  steadily increasing buzzing sound he could hear was a large, angry bumblebee. But then a massive pain engine hove into sight. Uh oh! Smack down. He lost and the filthy Xenos machine buzzed with alien pleasure.


All told, it was pretty close and the Haemonculi won by a narrow margin. Mr T had his fair share of bad luck and did a good job of pulling apart my red chaps.
So the prize for getting to the end of this post is that this battle report (and a couple previously) have been 8th edition games. I can wholeheartedly assure you that the system is a dream to play - smooth, accessible and fast-paced. GW has also made a herculean effort to update all the stats for every unit, so you'll be able to play all factions from day one. All the new datasheets are found in the new Index books (akin to the Grand Alliance books for Age of Sigmar). Mr T and I have always used the new Power Level system to build our armies as that suits our mid-core style. We found the system gives a very balanced game with the outcome often decided in the last turn (and sometime on the last die roll). Of course, 8th edition sees the release of the new Primaris Marines, and I'll definitely be adding units of these beautiful models to my Blood Angels army.

While the Dark Imperium is a dismal place to live, it's a new dawn for 40K hobbyists.

Friday, 26 May 2017

Vikings - Wolves of Midgard

It's time to strap on your walrus furs, grab your axe and get ready for some pillaging! And by that I mean; take another look at the graphics of another gorgeous game.

Vikings - Wolves of Midgard is a hack-and-slash RPG developed by Games Farm and published by Kalypso Media. You play a clan chief facing the arrival of some very historically inaccurate beasties who are intent on raiding your settlement and ruining your day. Cue some excellent hack and slash action, loot gathering and item crafting, all set in a gorgeously rendered fantasy vision of Scandiwegia. This is Diablo with furry boots, big axes and longboat-loads of Norse mythology. And wolves. Lots of wolves.

Games Farm have done a stunning job of realising the environments in this title. The naturalistic landscapes range from snow-covered mountain sides, to grassy uplands to beaches with rockpools. And they all look amazing. The textures do a lot of this work and the studio deserves an award for them. But they're combined with some awesome lighting work that gives the game a genuinely cinematic feel. The designs of the world and characters is ace as well, blending a lot of very naturalistic and historical items with some great fantasy visions, like floating ice monsters and goblin huts that resemble oversized poppy seed pods. I also need to give a shout-out to the art on the loading screens, which is beautifully done in a loose natural-media style and really evokes the mythic quality of the world.

So if you fancy some beautiful fantasy-Viking action this is definitely the game for you, my friend. It's available on console and PC, Mac and Linux.







Tuesday, 16 May 2017

You might be gurning and lumpen, but I still love you!

It transpired my cunning plan to use five, near-identical Oldhammer Scouts wasn't so sensible after all. A recent game of Shadow War: Armageddon mainly consisted of me trying to remember which Scout was which, and who was armed with what. This is neither fun, nor fair on your opponent. I needed something more WYSIWYG. And hence the two guys below.






These are from the plastic sprue released with Advanced Space Crusade. Admittedly they hail from the era of gurning, lumpen plastic miniatures, but I love them all the same. While they don't have the dynamism of their metal counterparts, they do have a kind of solid charm. Plus you really can't miss that MASSIVE gun and bright yellow chainsword, which helps with my 10th Company's identity crisis.

The eagle eyed nerds among you will notice that the Sergeant's pauldrons are rather mis-matched. After Rogue Trader there were several revisions to the Codex scheme of Space Marine iconography and livery. When these Scouts were released this IP was entering its current incarnation but still bedding in, as you can see in this scan below:


What I love about this cra-zy era is the liberal incorporation of  heraldry. I took the the Dave Gallagher White Dwarf cover and 'Eavy Metal miniature below as reference points.




I'm not sure what I'll be painting next for my Blood Angels. Perhaps a Primaris? ;-)

Sunday, 14 May 2017

Wode Warrior completed

Having posted a WIP a few weeks go I managed to finish this guy. To be honest, I'm not overly pleased with him, but I did learn a few good lessons so it was worth it.


Early on I got rather intimidated by the amount of detail on him. I spent ages highlighting the top of his shield and decided I couldn't go on that way without risking a melt down, cannibalism or some other malady. So I mixed up a subtle first hightlight dry brushed it on. This worked really well and I added two more highlights, this time using more precise strokes. I carefully dotted-on pin pricks of almost white too, which I'm getting better at and I find really lifts miniatures. Any resulting sloppyness was mitigated by adding the 'scratches', which are really quick to do. The result is a much for equitable balance of effort-to-result.

I managed to mess this up with his wode tattoos. These look really awful and only serve to break up the shape of his body. Never mind. However, the hallucinogenic blood worked quite well and the red vibrates against the olive drab of his shield exactly as it does in the Bisley artwork.

Visual research for Solonchak

I've been thinking more about Solonchak, the dried sea basin this guy inhabits in the Realm of Fire. It's a crazy mix of white-hot salt dunes shot through with luminous oxides. The depressions have become bone-fields where the cartilaginous remains of leviathans slowly crystalise. These Silurian carcasses eventually shatter and are ground to powder under their own weight. There is no sun in the sky that beats down all hours, but a borealis of fire that merely waxes and wanes according to the whim of the gods. In this toxic wasteland a living can be eeked out, but only by denizens that strike first. What remains of society is groups of apex predators, united not by race or species but by their ability to survive.

Wednesday, 10 May 2017

Synskin Shinobi

If men in flak vests or giants in gaudy Power Armour rock up, you can be certain you've annoyed the Emperor. But whem men in black, skin-tight rubber suits arrive, you know the Man Upstairs is properly miffed.

I wanted to intimidate my opponents more and the recent Made to Order Assassin was an ideal choice. As with all Jes Goodwin's sculpts, he was a joy to paint. Plus he reminds me of Joe Musashi, the hero from the Shiobi series of video games.

I've seen some lovely alternative colours for Assassins, but I chose to stick to the traditional black as an homage to Rogue Trader IP. I used the same technique as I employed on my Death Company - paint black over metal, zenith spray grey, then dump a wash of black ink mixed with black paint over the top. The wash settles in the recesses and knocks the grey back, just leaving it on the raised surfaces, to which you add a few highlights. Boom. There is a vent on top of his backpack which you can just see in the boxout. I highlighted this up with blues and that worked well to separate the element from the rest of the zentai suit (sorry - "synskin").


I also got both the Inquisitor and Demonhunter in Terminator armour to swell the ranks of my retro-clone Imperial agents. They are nowhere near the front of my painting queue, but shuffling around at the back, trying not to stand out while noting down people's names and nodding in a totally un-threatening manner.

Thursday, 4 May 2017

When you're in dire need of vengeance

I promised to post the five new Dire Avengers I completed for my Eldar army. To be honest they're not terribly exciting. The most remarkable thing about them is that they sit really well alongside the previous lot I did about five years ago. So that's a win for writing down your colour recipes.


I gave this squad different colour tabard clothes so I can separate the two lots if I need to. Here is an awkward family photo.


The gloss trims to the bases come out really nicely under lights. The new ones are a bit neater than my first attempts. The trick is to add grit/texture to the base tops and, once the glue has set, sand the trims with fine emery paper to ensure they're really smooth. Then paint and gloss.

Next up I'll be bringing you some psychic fun with my Warlocks.

Monday, 1 May 2017

You can't hide the truth from... MINDHORN!

Mindhorn is a high-grade-capoeira detective with the power to SEE the truth with his bionic eye. He's also, sadly, not real, but the on-screen persona of Richard Thorncroft. What's also sad is that Thorncroft hasn't had much work since his 80s hit series and has just lost his agent. If only he could somehow redeem his career in a wildly implausible and hilarious manner? Well, step this way, sir...

Back in the real world, Mindhorn is the new offering from ex-Boosh duo Julian Barratt and Simon Farnaby. It's a hilarious romp in the vein of Hot Fuzz and Alpha Papa, gently poking fun at classic British detective dramas, crap TV merchandise and the Isle of Man. It sees Barratt waddle his way from one farce to another in a punchy, well constructed comedy.

On Saturday Barratt and Farnaby came to sunny* Nottingham to accompany a showing and give a Q&A afterwards. They are as amusing in the flesh as on-screen and the audience was consistently reduced to giggles. One of the aspects they touched on was all the retro-clone merchandise that was created to dress the film's sets. In the fictional world, the TV show Mindhorn spawned endless bits of clutter like dolls, stickers, videos and shatter-proof rulers, all of which had to be created by the art department. Some of these items are shown on the great site belonging to the Art Department intern Emma Rosling in her excellent portfolio. These bits of ephemera are spot-on and really help to build the world of Mindhorn.

Chief amongst this glut of merch is the Mindhorn doll. Barratt was asked if he kept one of them. He doesn't. Nor, sadly, are there any plans to mass-produce the item for sale. Barratt is afraid that the film will bomb, the dolls won't sell, and he'll be found hanging in a room surrounded by tiny facsimiles of his fictional self. Yikes!





*Nottingham is rarely sunny. It is, at best, overcast.